Adopt a coral for Father’s Day

Make your dad feel special this year, contribute to ocean protection by adopting a coral in his name. The gift that keeps on giving.

Looking for an eco-friendly gift idea that your dad would love for Father’s Day (or any time of year)?

 

For 30€, adopt a coral for your dad and receive a trendy personalised adoption certificate to give him on this special day! His coral will be transplanted onto our marine protected area the following month.

 

Better than any other gift you’d thought of, right?

How does it work?

1 Name his coral Adopt a coral for your father and give it a name! By choosing to "adopt a coral as a gift", it is your dad who will immediately receive a gift code to name his coral himself.
2 Receive a beautiful adoption certificate With a picture, the name you gave his coral, a picture of our team member who will transplant it for him, and its GPS location.
3 We will transplant it for him We will transplant a coral in your father's name onto our restoration area and bring the reef back to life thanks to your unique gift!

Your adoption certificate

Receive your dad’s adoption certificate by email.

Frame it or send it to your mum digitally on Father’s Day!

 

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Why restore coral ecosystems?

Biodiversity

A habitat for biodiversity

Scientists estimate that coral reefs are home to more than 25% of marine species. Corals are also at the core of the formation of other ecosystems.

Coastal protection

A coastal protection

Reefs only cover 0.2% of the oceans. Yet they protect more than 150,000 kilometres of coastline in more than 100 countries and territories. They can form a barrier that absorbs wave energy and thus help reduce coastal erosion.

Food resource

A food resource

About 1 billion people live within 100 kilometres of coral reefs and are likely to benefit from their ecosystem services. 330 million people directly depend on them. Reefs can yield between 5 and 15 tonnes of fish and shellfish per square kilometre.

Economy

Of economic importance

Millions of people around the world depend on reefs for employment. According to an estimate, the total annual net benefit of the world’s coral reefs is $29.8 billion.

Health

A medical future

Coral reefs also contribute to research advancements, in particular by providing interesting possibilities for the treatment of various diseases.

Biodiversity Coastal protection Food resource Economy Health
biodiversité

A habitat for biodiversity

Scientists estimate that coral reefs are home to more than 25% of marine species. Corals are also at the core of the formation of other ecosystems.

protection côtière

A coastal protection

Reefs only cover 0.2% of the oceans. Yet they protect more than 150,000 kilometres of coastline in more than 100 countries and territories. They can form a barrier that absorbs wave energy and thus help reduce coastal erosion.

alimentation

A food resource

About 1 billion people live within 100 kilometres of coral reefs and are likely to benefit from their ecosystem services. 330 million people directly depend on them. Reefs can yield between 5 and 15 tonnes of fish and shellfish per square kilometre.

economie

Of economic importance

Millions of people around the world depend on reefs for employment. According to an estimate, the total annual net benefit of the world’s coral reefs is $29.8 billion.

science

A medical future

Coral reefs also contribute to research advancements, in particular by providing interesting possibilities for the treatment of various diseases.

Coral reefs are damaged due to an accumulation of threats resulting from human activities. Overfishing, pollution and coastal development are at the top of the list of chronic stressors. Others are dredged or sandblasted for their limestone or to improve access and navigational safety.

 

If we do not act quickly, according to some scientists, corals could disappear by 2050.

Our marine conservation programme so far

We are currently restoring the damaged reefs of Hatamin island near the village of Seraya Besar in Indonesia.

40 000

corals have already been transplanted thanks to this initiative, allowing this village of 750 inhabitants to continue to make a living from fishing.

5

times more species of fish on the restored area in just 4 years.

30.2

times more fish on our marine protected area in 4 years.