Marine conservation science

Data collection and innovation are at the heart of our approach.

Find out how

Data collection & innovation

Thanks to the involvement of the local team, we have set up a scientific zone in our marine protected area.

This area allows us to test and optimize different restoration techniques, to try to understand some of the phenomena observed in the area and to give the local team the opportunity to put into action different ideas, and thus develop their scientific curiosity.

In 2018, many structures of different shapes were tested (concrete hexagons, metal domes, metal bars, bi-material structures). One year later, the results showed a better growth rate on the metal tables, tested at the beginning of the project. Concrete hexagons and metal bars are subject to sedimentation due to their proximity to the substrate, preventing the proper development of coral fragments.

The metal domes have a good growth rate and the corals grow in a multi-directional manner.

In a process of constant improvement, we have also decided to continue its search for substrates, while reducing its ecological impact as much as possible. In 2019, the team decided to work more and more with bio-sourced materials. As a result, new bi-material structures are currently being tested, and should be fully implemented in 2020.

Biological data analysis

The areas of analysis

Coral Guardian analyzes scientific data from three specific areas of the marine protected area :

  • Control Zone: an unrestored area
  • Coeur de Corail Zone (CC): a restored area
  • Terrasses de Corail Zone (CT): a restored area
Evolution of the number of families

On the restored areas, namely Coeur de Corail (CC) and Terrasses de Corail (CT), a constant evolution is taking place since 2015 on the family diversity of fish.

Evolution of the number of species

In terms of the evolution of the number of fish species in the Coeur de Corail (CC) and Terrasses de Corail (CT) areas, there has been an average increase of 17.5% since 2018.

Evolution of corals

Every month, we analyze the growth, mortality and bleaching rates of corals present on our marine protected area.

The areas of analysis Evolution of the number of families Evolution of the number of species Evolution of corals
restored reef - Coral Guardian

Coral Guardian analyzes scientific data from three specific areas of the marine protected area :

  • Control Zone: an unrestored area
  • Coeur de Corail Zone (CC): a restored area
  • Terrasses de Corail Zone (CT): a restored area
Number of families - Coral Guardian

On the restored areas, namely Coeur de Corail (CC) and Terrasses de Corail (CT), a constant evolution is taking place since 2015 on the family diversity of fish.

Number of species - Coral Guardian

In terms of the evolution of the number of fish species in the Coeur de Corail (CC) and Terrasses de Corail (CT) areas, there has been an average increase of 17.5% since 2018.

Measuring coral growth - Coral Guardian

Every month, we analyze the growth, mortality and bleaching rates of corals present on our marine protected area.

Social data analysis

Social monitoring

In order to better monitor the impacts of the coral restoration project on the island of Hatamin, on the surrounding area, and more precisely on the life of the villagers of Seraya Besar, we set up a social monitoring system from the beginning of the project, in 2015.

Data collection

Each month, we interview 10 fishermen from the village about their fishing habits and their family’s eating habits. This provides a more global view of the impact of our restoration actions on the management of fishing stocks and their evolution.

Data analysis

We regularly analyze the data collected since 2015 in order to allow the local team to concretely show the value of this type of conservation program to the villagers of Seraya Besar and then to extend this model to other neighboring islands.

The feedback of local fishermen

Fishermen themselves have reported a better fishing rate, with larger species, since 2017. They now fish closer to the village, thus taking fewer risks than before to find fish. These concrete results will allow us to raise awareness among a large number of people in the region.

Social monitoring Data collection Data analysis The feedback of local fishermen
Fishing - Coral Guardian

In order to better monitor the impacts of the coral restoration project on the island of Hatamin, on the surrounding area, and more precisely on the life of the villagers of Seraya Besar, we set up a social monitoring system from the beginning of the project, in 2015.

fishing village - Coral Guardian

Each month, we interview 10 fishermen from the village about their fishing habits and their family’s eating habits. This provides a more global view of the impact of our restoration actions on the management of fishing stocks and their evolution.

Fish - Coral Guardian

We regularly analyze the data collected since 2015 in order to allow the local team to concretely show the value of this type of conservation program to the villagers of Seraya Besar and then to extend this model to other neighboring islands.

Fishing village - Coral Guardian

Fishermen themselves have reported a better fishing rate, with larger species, since 2017. They now fish closer to the village, thus taking fewer risks than before to find fish. These concrete results will allow us to raise awareness among a large number of people in the region.

Scientific articles

With a desire to make marine science accessible to the greatest number of people, Coral Guardian has developed a partnership with the environmental student association Bio Campus, from the Sup’Biotech school, in order to simplify scientific articles on coral reefs.

Each month, students from the Bio Campus association, deal with a topical or fundamental subject, based on scientific literature and that concerns coral ecosystems. These articles are then published on different platforms, and allow the general public, internationally, to be made aware of the importance of these threatened ecosystems, which are essential for the survival of our oceans.

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Scientific partners

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We are always looking for new scientific collaborations (organizations, universities, companies or other actors). Contact us if you have a project in mind!
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