Participatory marine conservation

Everyone has their role to play in protecting coral reefs.

Find out how

Empowering local communities

Reef restoration is not an end but a means.

 

It allows the involvement of local populations by helping them understand their natural environment in order to protect it more effectively. By becoming aware of the importance of corals, local populations become the first actors in their protection.

 

We are currently located in Indonesia and in Spain, and will soon be extending our work to other countries. Stay tuned!

Coral restoration

Restoration techniques

The choice of restoration technique depends on the local context. At the beginning of each project, fragments of opportunity (coral fragments that are found broken but still alive) are collected and transplanted onto solid structures placed in favourable locations for their growth.

In certain areas, our technique is then based on coral fragmentation. This technique stabilises the coral fragments on a solid structure. By fixing onto the substrate, the coral will grow, thus bringing back biodiversity within the reef. Each coral fragment is taken from the local area.

If the seabed isn’t too damaged, the corals are transplanted directly onto their natural environment.

A typical month for our teams

Our teams around the world work full-time on the projects to protect and restore coral ecosystems.

Each month is punctuated by a work routine that includes restoration, raising awareness, scientific monitoring and the protection of the marine protected areas.

Social and scientific survey

In order to help manage local marine resources and follow-up on the projects, social monitoring has been set up. This includes monitoring the habits of the various local stakeholders regarding their interactions with corals, for example for fishing.

Concerning the environmental monitoring of the coral transplantation, our teams regularly follow the evolution of the transplanted corals, thanks to numerous indicators such as the growth rate, mortality rate, bleaching rate or the return of biodiversity.

Protection and raising awareness

Our teams around the world work on local marine protected areas.

In Indonesia, our team is present every day to ensure a relentless protection and thus avoid any illegal fishing on the restored area and raise awareness among tourists and boat captains.

Restoration techniques A typical month for our teams Social and scientific survey Protection and raising awareness
Coral restoration - Coral Guardian

The choice of restoration technique depends on the local context. At the beginning of each project, fragments of opportunity (coral fragments that are found broken but still alive) are collected and transplanted onto solid structures placed in favourable locations for their growth.

In certain areas, our technique is then based on coral fragmentation. This technique stabilises the coral fragments on a solid structure. By fixing onto the substrate, the coral will grow, thus bringing back biodiversity within the reef. Each coral fragment is taken from the local area.

If the seabed isn’t too damaged, the corals are transplanted directly onto their natural environment.

Coral restoration - Coral Guardian

Our teams around the world work full-time on the projects to protect and restore coral ecosystems.

Each month is punctuated by a work routine that includes restoration, raising awareness, scientific monitoring and the protection of the marine protected areas.

Coral restoration - Coral Guardian

In order to help manage local marine resources and follow-up on the projects, social monitoring has been set up. This includes monitoring the habits of the various local stakeholders regarding their interactions with corals, for example for fishing.

Concerning the environmental monitoring of the coral transplantation, our teams regularly follow the evolution of the transplanted corals, thanks to numerous indicators such as the growth rate, mortality rate, bleaching rate or the return of biodiversity.

buoy line - marine protected area

Our teams around the world work on local marine protected areas.

In Indonesia, our team is present every day to ensure a relentless protection and thus avoid any illegal fishing on the restored area and raise awareness among tourists and boat captains.

Our pilot project

Pilot project on Hatamin island & our “Adopt a coral” program

 

In 2015, it is in Seraya Besar, a fishing village located in the region of East Nusa Tenggara in Indonesia, that the Coral Guardian team realizes the difficulties of these inhabitants to meet their needs. Indeed, they had to go fishing further and further away in order to meet the food and economic needs of their families.

We then decided to implement our participatory marine conservation model, involving local people on the ground and the international community through our ‘Adopt a Coral‘ program. Each adoption contributes to the reef’s restoration in Indonesia.

Our pilot project is then launched on an island near the village of Seraya Besar: Hatamin island.

40 000

corals transplanted in 4 years

30,2

times more fish on our restored area in 4 years

1,2 ha

marine protected area created

30

local jobs have been created since the start of the project

Our past programs

2020 S.O.S. Corales
2016 Nusa Penida

300 corals transplanted

2013 Serangan Bali

1600 corals transplanted

16 local jobs created

2013 Underwater museum

270 corals transplanted

2013 Jardin corallien

300 corals transplanted

2013 Manta Reef - Gili Trawangan

1400 corals transplanted